Breakout sessions

If you have already purchased a ticket, you will receive an email inviting you to choose two of them. You can also pick breakouts on the day, but they are allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Breakout sessions – round 1

1. Processes and Apps for Productivity

Did you know that the average person spends 13 hours a week looking at and responding to emails? Moreover, if you’re distracted from the task, it takes around 16 minutes to refocus on what you were doing. By optimising the way you work, and introducing productivity workflows, it’s possible to achieve more in less time, and avoid those costly distractions.

The future of work is faster paced, unlimited projects and multi-discipled, are you ready for keeping up and on it? Join Liz Hardwick for this super-productive breakout session where we will look at some of the most popular productivity hacks and explore the top apps that can make you a productivity pro. This session is delivered by DigiEnable and sponsored by BECTU.

2. Break-out with CLOCK!

Do people describe you as a Sector Expert? Are you engaging in creative work at a strategic level? If so, then why not CLOCK your skills with national and international peers in your sector. Come and find out how CLOCK works in a short Peer-to-Peer Learning session using the CLOCK toolkit with peer mentors and reviewers.

Professor Denise Stanley introduces Collective Learning Open Curriculum Kit, a digital interactive toolkit for employers, professional associations and freelancers to validate workers' skills.

3. Britain’s got talent - so why don’t we use it?

Practical ideas about how to think differently about recruitment in order to attract a wider range of talent into your organisation. The Weston Jerwood Creative Bursaries programme has been working to create fairer access into the arts sector since 2010 – in which time we have co-created 124 paid placements with 111 organisations across the UK. Our panel will include funders, hosts and participants who have been involved with the programme during this time.

4. Influencing Governments: how can the creative industries make their case to ministers and politicians?

Chaired by Tom Watson, Deputy Leader of the Labour Party and Shadow Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.

5. National Skills Academy: everyone's a winner

The FE Leadership Colleges of the National Skills Academy for Creative and Cultural are keen to work with employers to address their current and future skills needs. This session provides an opportunity to hear examples of effective training/work experience models from some of our FE leadership colleges based throughout the UK.

The breakout will then engage delegates in a dialogue around issues such as 'work readiness', leading into a conversation about how best to collaborate to support work experience/industry training, and explore with delegates what it takes to develop a partnership between industry and education where everyone's a winner.

6. Future skills needs and challenges in the music industry

Chaired by Michael Dugher, CEO, UK Music

 

Breakout sessions – round 2

7. Creative talent pipeline

By championing cultural education and developing social enterprises that engage and inspire young people, we attract and grow the talent that will strengthen the future of our sector.

How can we help industry and education understand each other and work together more regularly to diversify opportunities for young people and their outlook on careers and employability?  Come and join Curious Minds and other industry partners to share ideas, discuss and debate!

8. Britain’s got talent - so why don’t we use it?

Practical ideas about how to think differently about recruitment in order to attract a wider range of talent into your organisation. The Weston Jerwood Creative Bursaries programme has been working to create fairer access into the arts sector since 2010 – in which time we have co-created 124 paid placements with 111 organisations across the UK. Our panel will include funders, hosts and participants who have been involved with the programme during this time.

9. Tour of Salford Quays

Jennifer Taylor, Quays Culture, will take you through a brief history of the area from once being Britain’s third largest port, through decline, regeneration, the opening of The Lowry, Imperial War Museum North, and now home to Media City.

Hear how Quays Culture works with partners to produce a range of world-class installations and performances to the public spaces on The Quays. And see their current exhibition - Technology: Past & Future (a digital art exhibition working with artists from across the ten boroughs of Greater Manchester).

10. Building a future workforce from the ground up

The Factory, due to open in 2020, will be one of the UK’s most significant arts facilities, operated by MIF, one of the premier artist-led festivals in the world. Its vison is to be where the art of the future is made, and one of its founding principles is to place skills and training at its core. What does it take to make this real?

Mark Ball, Associate Artistic Director at Manchester International Festival / The Factory, and Alison Clark, Skills, Training and Education Lead, The Factory, will summarise what’s been done so far and explore together with delegates what it takes to realise the culture shift needed to create the workforce of the future alongside the art.

11. Managing apprentices: a best practice approach

An introductory session for those new to managing, and/or in the process of recruiting, apprentices.

Presented by Sara Whybrew, Creative & Cultural Skills, this session will provide guidance on what apprenticeships are (and what they aren't), the role of the manager versus the role of the training provider, things to consider when recruiting and inducting those who may be new to the world of work, and quality indicators for Managers/employers to consider when selecting training providers.